Friday, June 24, 2016

The Lost Years- Secondary Trauma

Mike and I are sitting here watching TV tonight and 20/20 comes on.  They're talking about a case from 2011, the case of missing college student Lauren Spierer.  They stated it was one of the most well known missing person cases of all time.  I consider myself someone who keeps up with current events, sometimes I even get pulled into stories and (admittedly) obsess over them.  But this one, it didn't ring a bell...at all.  I asked Mike, "Do you remember this?". He didn't either.  Then we realized the year...2011.

Mike lovingly refers to the years of 2010 and 2011 as our own personal 'Nam, because there are long periods of time, many significant events, that neither one of us remember.  We have blocked them out I suppose, similar (although obviously incomparable) to what a soldier, post war, may experience.  They were indeed the most trying years of our lives so far. 

These were the first years we had the twins home.

Here's a perfect example of our lapse in memory.  In 2012 I said I wanted to go to Columbus for my birthday to go to the science museum and the famous Columbus Zoo.  About halfway through our day at the zoo we came upon the polar bear exhibit.  Something seemed familiar, there was a playground at the entrance of the exhibit that I could have sworn I had pictures of the girls playing on before.  I asked the zoo employee if the Cleveland Zoo had a similar exhibit and he told me no, that the Columbus Zoo was the only one in the state that had polar bears, let alone that very same playground.  I'm sure he thought I had forgotten to take my meds that morning or something!

Here we are in 2012:
 
We finished our day at the zoo, both of us trying to remember when we would have brought them to Columbus before then.  We were able to rule out that we had taken them the previous summer so that only left the summer of 2010...right after we brought them home.  We wouldn't have been that crazy!!  There's no way!!  We were so broke!!  How would we have even afforded it?  Where would we have stayed??  To this day we can't answer those questions folks, but I do have photo evidence that we were at the Columbus Zoo the summer of 2010.



Here is the infamous polar bear playground photo (apparently my sole memory from this visit)...
Parents of kids from trauma will attest to this, but there is such a thing as secondary trauma, and most of us who are parenting trauma kiddos would fit the bill for this diagnosis.  We get PTSD from our kids' PTSD.  It's a vicious cycle.  You can read more about this here. This article states it best:
 "Because these behaviors serve as a way for their child to communicate and express how their trauma has affected them, parents are, thus, being exposed, on a regular basis, to their child’s trauma.  Parents who are experiencing secondary trauma may: feel anxious, tense, easily overwhelmed, and have sleep difficulties; re-experience their child’s aggressive, suicidal, or self-harming behaviors or details of their child’s trauma; feel as if they have changed and are not themselves anymore; or wish to escape or avoid their child or their child’s behaviors."
Those first two years with the twins were so wrought with trauma that our brains had blocked so much of it out completely!

We spent most of our days doing behavior modification.  Our girls were so filled with rage, coupled with the fact that they didn't speak English so they couldn't communicate their feelings, even if they were capable at 4 years old of putting it into words.  They would scream, kick, hit, spit and bite.  We spent a good amount of their waking hours teaching them the basics of how to behave, using holds that would assist them in calming themselves and their bodies.  We would find out later that they both have what's called Sensory Processing Disorder (very common in children from trauma) so the pressure of the holds would physically help them calm down.  (Now we have weighted blankets).

I am so thankful that I took so many pictures those first two years so that they can fill in the major gaps in my memory and so that the girls have a beautiful pictorial representation of all of the fun we did have those first two years.  They made SO MUCH PROGRESS in those years that it was unbelievable.  I do remember those hopeless days when we thought we'd never get to the point that they could function in a school environment, never go to a friend's house to play and never be calm enough that our cats would come out of hiding around them!  If you are in that place, the abyss of the unknowns about your child, please know there is always hope!  They will improve and so will you.  You will learn to be their best advocate and you will learn how to parent them, even if it was different than you thought you'd parent.  God will give you the strength if you ask for it.  I still have to ask Him for help, strength, patience, grace and love for my kids on a daily basis.  Most importantly YOU ARE NOT ALONE and YOU ARE NOT CRAZY!!

It's pretty amazing what our brains do in order to cope with things.  It makes me wonder if other parents have these experiences.  One of my best friends had a baby that had a very rough first year of life.  He struggled with acid reflux so badly that this child cried CONSTANTLY.  Perhaps she experiences some lapses in time due to that traumatic year.  If you have a story about a period of your life that your brain blocked out, leave it in the comments!  It will help me not feel so crazy!!  Ha!

7 comments:

Amy Mullens said...

The year that we started ALBC, Randy's brother died, we couldn't sell the house that we wanted to sell for 6 months and I lost a baby at 12 weeks along. It was also Zachary's first year and I hate that I can barely remember his baby days. We were in survival mode and because life was so dang hard we simply couldn't make our brains retain any memories.

Unknown said...

I appreciate your thoughts Sarah. Each of my kids is different. With Abi (birth) I was finishing a PhD in Math (not something I'd recommend). This was the first 2.5 years of her life. I have very little memory from this time, but I do have some journals, which I have read once since then and deemed myself crazy for all I went through. Then there was Eli (adopted at 10 mo from ET). That was during a time when Jeff was out of a job and I was working full time and then doing 25 hours of tutoring at home online. I have very few memories from that time too. And now bringing home 2 teenaged (2 and 1.5 years ago respectively). That has been, without a doubt, the hardest. Last fall was the hardest 5 months of my life. Everyone was in counseling. Sometimes I feel like we all need to go back. But things do progress, even though 2 steps forward is often followed by 3 steps back. We are making progress. And I am trying to remember that I prayed for this. And God brought these kids (all 4) into my life because He knew that He would be there to see me through. Love you Sarah!

Laurel Gutbrod said...

I always read your blog posts because we have at least 2 things in common: we are buckeyes for life and twins mommas. Undoubtedly your twins have challenges that I can only imagine but I would encourage you to look for a twin mom's club in your area. I think you would be surprised how many common experiences we have. As I was reading this blog I thought back to my twins entire first year of life. There was ALWAYS someone crying.I took a ton of pictures and made monthly update videos and baby books for each of them. But that's all I have. I knew I was desperately holding into these memories that were quickly fading away. Never feel alone in these trials of motherhood. There are so many who are here to listen!

Laurel Gutbrod said...

I always read your blog posts because we have at least 2 things in common: we are buckeyes for life and twins mommas. Undoubtedly your twins have challenges that I can only imagine but I would encourage you to look for a twin mom's club in your area. I think you would be surprised how many common experiences we have. As I was reading this blog I thought back to my twins entire first year of life. There was ALWAYS someone crying.I took a ton of pictures and made monthly update videos and baby books for each of them. But that's all I have. I knew I was desperately holding into these memories that were quickly fading away. Never feel alone in these trials of motherhood. There are so many who are here to listen!

Sarah Bratt said...

Thank you all for your posts. It is interesting to hear that mamas going through any kind of hard times tend to go into survival mode. We need to keep on keeping it real and be able to talk about this stuff with one another so we can lean on each other and stop feeling so isolated through these times.

Bubbasmom said...

Our son arrived as an infant. After 5 years of attachment ignorance (and the mayhem it brought), we started attachment therapy with our son. All I recall from the next two years is that I held him for hours, ate cereal and pb & j sandwiches for many dinners, avoided socializing due to depression, exhaustion, and the constant need for proper responses to our son's behaviors, and prayed constantly. I have pictures that look happy, so I know God provided joy as well as strength, wisdom, and patience. I also remember the sense of humor He provided, so when snot was blown on my face I actually turned away to laugh instead of cry. I had no support group, and family and friends just didn't get it. I found I am capable of tremendous rage and have been a terrible example at times of self control. As my son has healed I have been able to apologize and tell him I've got work to do too. So when he makes statements like "I love you more because you understand my feelings", I know I've been doing something right. God will sustain you, of that you can be sure.

Bubbasmom said...

Our son arrived as an infant. After 5 years of attachment ignorance (and the mayhem it brought), we started attachment therapy with our son. All I recall from the next two years is that I held him for hours, ate cereal and pb & j sandwiches for many dinners, avoided socializing due to depression, exhaustion, and the constant need for proper responses to our son's behaviors, and prayed constantly. I have pictures that look happy, so I know God provided joy as well as strength, wisdom, and patience. I also remember the sense of humor He provided, so when snot was blown on my face I actually turned away to laugh instead of cry. I had no support group, and family and friends just didn't get it. I found I am capable of tremendous rage and have been a terrible example at times of self control. As my son has healed I have been able to apologize and tell him I've got work to do too. So when he makes statements like "I love you more because you understand my feelings", I know I've been doing something right. God will sustain you, of that you can be sure.

Post a Comment

 

Blog Template by BloggerCandy.com